Video Presentation Tips: Rx for your Voice

There are a myriad of things which contribute to a presenter’s effectiveness on video. Some of them are overlooked because they seem almost invisible. Yet regardless of how seemingly unimportant they might be, there’s one element that is vitally important.

Your voice.

Your vocal tone, quality, pitch, inflection, resonance, and authority is such an integral part of your video presentation. In fact, your voice carries more influence than you might think. Voices can reveal confidence and credibility, they can grab interest and attention, and they can make messages personable and memorable. This blog will be the first in a short series on using voice in video.

There are several ways to maximize your voice in video. To begin, just as an athlete benefits from a warm up before a race or cardio activity, the voice also benefits from warm-ups. This is because your vocal cords are muscles too. When you first wake up the morning of a video shoot, warm up your voice by humming. This is less harsh on your voice than speaking and a healthy, gradual way to warm up your voice. As you get closer to the video shoot time, you can also sing softly–even if you think you can’t sing–because singing is actually less harsh on your vocal cords than speaking. Speak repetitive vowel sounds to warm up your voice; for example, you can say “Ahh, Ahh, Ahh, or Iii, Iii, Iii, or Eee, Eee, Eee.”

During the video shoot, if you find your mouth is dry, it is best to drink room temperature water. Extreme hot temperatures or very cold drinks can constrict your vocal cords. Additionally, if you are someone whose mouth creates clicks when you speak (some click louder than others), eating some bites of green apples can coat your throat and a little orange or citrus will moisten your mouth. There are also some throat sprays you can use to help minimize the mouth clicking or consonant pops. Recording with a pop filter on your microphone can also help eliminate the popping of consonants.

Lastly, even though your microphone amplifies the audio for you and you don’t have to project your voice like you would in a stage play, you still need proper breath support. Your diaphragm is designed to give you the most breath support by breathing from your abdomen. When you’re laying on your back, your body will naturally breathe this way. So you can observe how much deeper your breath support can be when you speak from there when on-camera.

Tune in for more on how you can maximize your voice in video presentations in future blogs.

What are some voice tips that have worked for you?

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