On-Camera Presentation Framework: Message Design

I remember when fonts first emerged on the word processing scene. Because we now had the world (or keys) at our fingertips and could display text however we wished, we did just that. After a short stint of reading documents with multiple fonts on one page, however, we realized the necessity for ground rules and–shall we say–acceptable protocol.

This same notion reared its head once again in the transition from classroom training to e-learning. All was fair game in the beginning as learning and coursework were transitioned online. As time went on, however, we realized that applying certain principles and strategies to online learning made it more effective while other techniques were less effective.

In today’s world, once again, we find ourselves in that place of change as a new medium explodes with growing popularity–online video. Online video is becoming the new medium for communicating, informing, entertaining, educating, and even marketing. The challenge, however, is that most professionals and individuals do not have experience or training presenting on-camera, framing a shot, or staging an effective backdrop.

core_elements_model_final

In response to this need, our company has found the above model helpful with clients. This model serves as a guiding framework for developing the skill sets for presenting effectively in video. The model is called “4 Core Elements of On-camera Presentations.”

This post will be dedicated to the first core element, message design. Message design includes many areas from content to language choice and supporting visuals to opening hooks. At its heart, message design is about placing yourself in the shoes of the viewer and asking what should this video include, address, or teach from the viewer’s perspective? Because after all, it’s ultimately all about the viewer.

Message design also includes your content outline for your video presentation. To begin, you want to isolate and identify the effect you want to produce in viewers with your video. This effect is also the impact, shown above on the model with the outstretched arrows. Then, working backward you can draft your video script to include the components that will bring about that effect.

Message Design also includes openers that hook your audience’s attention which means it’s not just “Hi, I’m XXX.” Keep in mind, that in the video world, you will always be competing for viewer attention. Even after you’ve successfully grabbed a viewer’s attention, we still have to maintain it. Openers can be startling statements, humorous visuals, though-provoking questions, pithy quotations, surprising statistics, etc. Just remember, you need to hook your viewer in those first few seconds.

Other aspects of message design include word choice/language, transitions, participatory cues, including supporting visuals where clarification is needed, concision and not repetition, overall content organization, and a “memorable” last impression. Thanks to the recency effect, if you’ve managed to persuade your viewer into watching the duration of your video, the last thing viewers see is what they’ll remember most.

Stay tuned for discussion in future posts of other key elements for skill development in on-camera presentations.

What do you think might be missing from this model? What say you?

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